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✼ La verdad de las mentiras Epub ✿ Author Mario Vargas Llosa – Activematrix.us

La verdad de las mentiras The Greatest Power Of Literature Is To Break Any Limits And This Book Allows Us To Partake In This Vargas Llosa Discusses Here Some Literary Works Such As Lolita, Death In Venice, The Stranger, Manhattan Transfer, Tropic Of Cancer And The Tin Drum This Splendid Work Is An Immersion In The Views Of The Author, One Of The Most Brilliant Writers Of Our Time, About The Purpose Of Literature And The Present And Future Of Books

✼ La verdad de las mentiras  Epub ✿ Author Mario Vargas Llosa – Activematrix.us
  • Paperback
  • 464 pages
  • La verdad de las mentiras
  • Mario Vargas Llosa
  • Spanish
  • 09 October 2018
  • 8466310835

    10 thoughts on “✼ La verdad de las mentiras Epub ✿ Author Mario Vargas Llosa – Activematrix.us


  1. says:

    Mario Vargas Llosa in 1976 at age 40, already an author of four outstanding literary novels.Peruvian Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa wrote this series of eight highly entertaining and perceptive essays on the nature, purpose and spirit of fiction, especially the novel, in English, as part of a lecture series at Syracuse University The last six essays are tied to one of his specific novels Here are the chapter headings 1 An Invitation of Borges s Fiction 2 Novels Disguised as History 3 Mario Vargas Llosa in 1976 at age 40, already an author of four outstanding literary novels.Peruvian Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa wrote this series of eight highly entertaining and perceptive essays on the nature, purpose and spirit of fiction, especially the novel, in English, as part of a lecture series at Syracuse University The last six essays are tied to one of his specific novels Here are the chapter headings 1 An Invitation of Borges s Fiction 2 Novels Disguised as History 3 Discovering a Method for Writing The Time of the Hero 4 On Being Nine and First Seeing the Sea The Green House 5 Playing with Time and Language Captain Pantoja and the Special Service 6 From Soap Opera to Serious Art Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter 7 The Author s Favorite of his Novels The War of the End of the World 8 Transforming a Lie into Truth The Real Life of Alejandro Mayta As a way of sharing some of the author s many keen insights, below are quotes, on from each of the first six essays, along with my comments This is why Borges despised the novel as a genre because it is impossible to dissociate the novel from living experience, by which I mean human imperfection In a novel you cannot be only perfect you must also be imperfect The imperfection that is essential in a novel was for Borges inartistic and, therefore, unacceptable A novel can spotlight all aspects of a character s outer and inner life and indirectly the reader s life , however mundane, trivial, egotistical or immature, even shedding light on the stream of inner thoughts, both conscious and unconscious I suspect a major reason for the popularity of the novel over the last nearly two hundred years is the fact we modern people love to read about day to day life with all its messy imperfections we can t get enough of tragedy and comedy, heroes and antiheroes, irony and parody, symbol and allegory, wordplay and dialogue, romance and decadence, fantasy and science fiction, realism and naturalism, horror and satire, imagined utopias and dystopias, drama anddrama, happy endings, bad endings and everything in between The novel is king and there is little sign of any future dethronement The novel was forbidden in the Spanish colonies by the Inquisition The Inquisition considered this literary genre, the novel, to be as dangerous for the spiritual faith of the Indians as for the moral and political behavior of society, and, of course, they were absolutely right We novelists must be grateful to the Spanish Inquisition for having discovered before any critic did the inevitable subversive nature of fiction In a very real sense, a novel is a second world, frequently a competing second world And this is exactly the reason why the hardheaded despise what a novel stands for I never read fiction I m only interested in ____ fill in the blank history, science, economics, commerce, etc So fumes legions of no nonsense, practical, nose to the grindstone men and women who want their world fixed, solid and serious As anyone with imagination and a bit of wisdom knows, such an attitude bespeaks a narrow, controlling mindset It s also bad for one s health The narrator and time give fiction its sovereignty, its independence from the real world A novel is never similar to the real world a novel is always a separate world, a world that has something essentially different from real reality The difference between fictitious reality and real reality is the presence of the narrator, which in real reality does not exist, and of the time structure, which in fiction is never similar to that of real life So the narrator makes all the difference or, in other words, how the story is told first person, third person or various other ways Also the way an author orchestrates time one continuous flow moving forward from first to last page or some other variation Personally, I tend to enjoy a passionate first person narrator caught in crisis where the author fills in the juicy past details and events leading up to the crisis The Kindly Ones, The Goldfinch, Bodies Electric, Double Indemnity, Notes from the Underground, A Fan s Notes But irrespective of how the author fashions narrator and time, this is the aesthetic difference a novel is a fictional reality constructed by a literary vision For those of us who love reading novels, we live through multiple lives in uniquely invented worlds When you write a novel you must not shrink from the idea of distorting or manipulating reality Distortion and manipulation of fact are necessary in a novel You must lie without any scruples, but in a convincing way so that the reader accepts your lies as truth If you succeed in the deception, something true will come through these lies, something that did not exist before, something that was not evident before But if your intention is just to reproduce things of reality in fiction, you will probably fail as a writer because literature, in order to persuade and convince the reader, must become a sovereign world, independent, a world that has emancipated itself from its mother, from reality VALIS, The Man in the High Castle, The Magus, The Last Good Kiss, Inverted World novels filled to the brim with lies and distortion, manipulation and falsification But by opening ourselves to these gifted writers, we, as readers, can participate in powerful truths My personal observation is real reality is vastly overrated Some books have been made into marvelous films, and some have been destroyed by films To tell a story with images is quite different from telling a story with words So you must be totally free to adapt, to change, to introduce new elements The cinema is, like the novel, one aspect of fiction In a film, as in a novel, you create a fiction that becomes a separate reality that must be persuasive and convincing This statement really underscores the uniqueness of a novel Attempting to take words from a literary masterpiece and simply transpose them to the screen can spell disaster Of course, with a creative director, the opposite can happen a classic film can be made of a bad novel, the prime example that comes to mind for me is The Graduate based on the forgotten novel by Charles Webb With Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter my idea was to write a novel with stereotypes, with clich s, with all the instruments of the popular novel, the soap opera, and the radio serial, but in such a way that these elements could be transformed into an artistic work, into something personal and original The novel is the grand, all powerful king in regard to how it can incorporate other genres effectively at will Entire novels have been written as one genre literary criticism of a poem Pale Fire, epistolary novel Lady Susan, diary Go Ask Alice, non fiction novel In Cold Blood The list could go on and on In the hands of a capable novelist like Mario Vargas Llosa, even a soap opera and ham radio serial can be transformed into art


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    A brilliant writer explains in detail the creative process behind 6 of his masterworks Reading this book is akin to taking a course from a Nobel prize winning writer This is one of those books that I think will prove to be instrumental in the development of my own writing My favorite parts in the book were the explanations behind the concepts of his books The process by which he performed his research The humility by which he explains he approached his books The very depths of research tha A brilliant writer explains in detail the creative process behind 6 of his masterworks Reading this book is akin to taking a course from a Nobel prize winning writer This is one of those books that I think will prove to be instrumental in the development of my own writing My favorite parts in the book were the explanations behind the concepts of his books The process by which he performed his research The humility by which he explains he approached his books The very depths of research that he chose to undertake were monumental Real interviews from the characters he chose to write about This deep immersion, he states, proved in the end to be indispensable The likes of which had he not undertaken would have probably left his books lacking in the necessary colors.Mario Vargas Llosa has a penchant for writing about meta concepts, or abstractions within abstractions The writer writing about the writer writing about the story He goes in depth into this process and this was most definitely one of my favorite aspects of this tutorial Another of my favorite parts in this particular book were the author s explanations that a fictitious work that is open about it s fictitiousness can be very useful and bring joy to our objective and subjective reality Mario explains that what is dangerous and detrimental to human societies is fictitious works that present themselves as objective reality The writer uses great examples stemming from books on political ideology The ideas presented in Utopian political ideologies being not grounded in objective reality have actually proven to be quite detrimental for Latin American countries Even though he admits that their intentions were good and noble, the Utopian idealism behind some of the political ideologies that have raced over the world in bloody revolutions to overthrow oppressive regimes have in fact proven to be just as bloody as the cruelty inflicted by the oppressive regimes Mario Vargas Llosa argues that this is due to the fictitious nature of these ideologies What I think that he is saying is that the idea inherent in most revolutionary political ideologies that one could bring down a makeshift paradise for everyone on earth is antithetical to the actual reality in which we reside The reality is that reality is not perfect Everything around us is subject to change, growth, decay, sickness, and death Not to mention the illusory nature of our own reality and even of what we perceive to be our own selves And let s not forget our own inherent limitations and dreadful ignorance of many things under the sun If one were to think about this deeply enough one could veritably go down a deep philosophical rabbit s hole of which we would not be able to escape even with the help of Alice, the Mad Hatter, all of the assorted Red Queen s playing cards, and the Cheshire cat So at the risk of ending this review abruptly, this will just have to do so as to save us from the deep abyssal mire of philosophical excrement in which we could find ourselves in


  4. says:

    A beautiful collection of essays on 35 of some of the best novels from the 20th century,from one of the best writers of the 20th and present century, and last year s 2010 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature,Mario Vargas Llosa An amazing book,feels like you re taking a course on literature.Each essay is a joy to read,they combine history,biography,the reasons and moments in time in which each book was written,the style that was use,and above all Vargas Llosa s opinion and comment about each A beautiful collection of essays on 35 of some of the best novels from the 20th century,from one of the best writers of the 20th and present century, and last year s 2010 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature,Mario Vargas Llosa An amazing book,feels like you re taking a course on literature.Each essay is a joy to read,they combine history,biography,the reasons and moments in time in which each book was written,the style that was use,and above all Vargas Llosa s opinion and comment about each novel.A surprise was to find only one novel from the spanish speaking world,and this one from the cuban writer Alejo Carpentier s El Reino De Este Mundo.I was expecting to find Julio Cortazar, Garcia Marquez,Bennedeti,Carlos Fuentes,etc.The book is one of the best from Vargas Llosa,as good as his novels,making you want to go in search of those books, he wakes up in you the appetite for reading them all.He shares with you the magic and joy of reading,the power of reading,the need of reading


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    Ca adevarul minciunii care este opera de arta nu e nici etic, nici istoric, nici social, ci pur si simplu estetic e deja un loc comun al viziunii critice si n ciuda titlului si a capitolului introductiv nu despre asta este vorba in cele 26 de eseuri ale lui Llosa, cu toate ca autorul confrunta notiunea de adevar cu marile teme romanesti istoria, timpul, societatea etc.Nu, ca orice cititor pacatos , care va sa zica nu citeste numai din placere ci si pentru a si crea probleme, a nvata si a se Ca adevarul minciunii care este opera de arta nu e nici etic, nici istoric, nici social, ci pur si simplu estetic e deja un loc comun al viziunii critice si n ciuda titlului si a capitolului introductiv nu despre asta este vorba in cele 26 de eseuri ale lui Llosa, cu toate ca autorul confrunta notiunea de adevar cu marile teme romanesti istoria, timpul, societatea etc.Nu, ca orice cititor pacatos , care va sa zica nu citeste numai din placere ci si pentru a si crea probleme, a nvata si a se imbogati sufleteste dupa propriile spuse , Llosa este in cautarea acelui adevar care a conferit valoare romanelor amintite n volum.Evident, un adevar subiectiv caci alt loc comun orice opera are at tea interpretari c ti cititori Iar farmecul unui eseu pe marginea unei opere spre deosebire de abordarea critica, oarecum scolastica pentru ca se pretinde obiectiva este ca nu o pune n niste tipare si nici n o explica, ci, cum spunea Blaga, i adauga alte nvelisuri de mister, care uneori sa nt mpla sa coincida cu propria ta viziune despre opera respectiva, alteori aduce o interpretare noua si proaspata.Iata c teva adevaruri pe care le stiam sau le am descoperit despre mari carti Minunata lume noua a lui Huxley aduce nca un argument alaturi de 1984, etc ca utopiile s nt acceptate si valabile numai n arta si literatura n viata, ele s nt n permanenta contradictie cu independenta individuala si cu libertatea p.76 Marele Gatsby creeaza un erou nu m am g ndit niciodata la asta care e literatura pura si nu un om n carne si oase Bastardul unei lungi genealogii literare, Gatsby este un om pe care un agent fatidic, nflacar ndu i dorinta si imaginatia, l face sa se ndoiasca de lumea reala, orient ndu l spre vis p 49 Eu nu s nt Stiller extraordinar roman ilustreaza revolta mpotriva unei societati n care mediocritatea disimulata n bunastare materiala patrunde si n relatiile umane, saracindu le si frustr ndu le p 123 Strainul lui Camus aduce n prim plan un erou antisocial fara sa fie revoltat Prin comportamentul lui ciudat, Meursault demonstreaza precaritatea si morala ndoielnica a conventiilor si riturilor civilizatiei p 104 n sf rsit, Lolita , fascinantul si controversatul roman al lui Nabokov, spune o poveste scandaloasa, dar nu erotica Constientizarea raului de catre protagonist confera aventurii acestuia caracterul moral nesanatos si inacceptabil mai degraba dec t v rsta victimei lui care, n fond, e numai cu un an mai mica dec t Julieta lui Shakespeare Iar ceea ce agraveaza greseala lui, priv ndu l de mila cititorului, este antipatia si aroganta, precum si dispretul pe care i l inspira toti barbatii si toate femeile din jur, inclusiv frumoasele animalute semipubere care l excita at t pp 130 131 Ma opresc aici, nu nainte de a adauga pe lista cartilor pe care va trebui sa le citesc, urmatoarele John Dos Passos, Manhattan Transfer Henry Miller, Tropicul Cancerului Elias Canetti, Auto da fe, Graham Greene, Puterea si gloria, Alberto Moravia, Frumoasa romana, Lampedusa, Ghepardul, Junichiro Tanizaki, Casa frumoaselor adormite, Doris Lessing Caietul auriu The Golden Notebook , Saul Bellow, Herzog, Hemingway, Parisul era o sarbatoare A Moveable Feast


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    I readthan I initially wanted, I couldn t help myself from reading about books I haven t read yet But I definitely want to, after that As I said or at least, thought I like Llosa s criticism and apreciate a lot the tone he uses and how he avoids interpretating evreything for you, the analysis he does and the details he notices so acurately.Though he criticized Steinbeck s East of Eden which I loved or at least, it s configuration and his narrative technique, I wasn t bothered He d I readthan I initially wanted, I couldn t help myself from reading about books I haven t read yet But I definitely want to, after that As I said or at least, thought I like Llosa s criticism and apreciate a lot the tone he uses and how he avoids interpretating evreything for you, the analysis he does and the details he notices so acurately.Though he criticized Steinbeck s East of Eden which I loved or at least, it s configuration and his narrative technique, I wasn t bothered He didn t overreact, he gave Caesar what was Caesar s The books I ve read about Death in Venice, Thomas MannDubliners, James JoyceManhattan Transfer, John Dos PassosMrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf I almost think I liked the articlethan I ll ever like a Woolf book time will tell D Steppenwolf, Herman HesseL etranger, Albert CamusThe Old Man and the Sea, Ernest HemingwayEast of Eden, John SteinbeckLolita, Vladimir NabokovThe Tin Drum, G nter GrassThe End of The Affair, Graham GreeneDoctor Jivago, Boris PasternakThe House of the Sleeping Beauty, Yasunari Kawabata 13 out of 35so I m not sure I should call this a read book I ll come back to it, of course, after I read someof the books he presented here.Oh And the epilogue he added in a later edition about life and literarure is excelent He argued very well the need of literature that isandobvious throughout the world I share his opinion about introducing people to literature from an early age it s family s responsability to help them in discovering it.Also, in the prologue, a sort of introduction to the book, Llosa ingeminates what he discussed in Letters to a young novelist great novels tell the truth, only poor novels lie.A little tribute to what the Spanish Inquizition revealed and overall, good analysis of The truth of lies good stuff here


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    Absolutamente genial, al menos el ensayo que da el t tulo al libro Yo incluso lo cito en conversaciones coloquiales, importa que las historias que contemos no sean verdad No es que podemos concebirlas porque PODR AN SUCEDER y eso las convierte en verdad Es una interrogante muy astuta, dir a yo y me recuerda a lo mismo que dice Asimov sobre la ciencia ficci n que es importante imagina a un mundo que es posible.En el caso de Vargas Llosa es incluso m s posible porque algunas de las cosas que Absolutamente genial, al menos el ensayo que da el t tulo al libro Yo incluso lo cito en conversaciones coloquiales, importa que las historias que contemos no sean verdad No es que podemos concebirlas porque PODR AN SUCEDER y eso las convierte en verdad Es una interrogante muy astuta, dir a yo y me recuerda a lo mismo que dice Asimov sobre la ciencia ficci n que es importante imagina a un mundo que es posible.En el caso de Vargas Llosa es incluso m s posible porque algunas de las cosas que imaginamos podr an f cilmente estar pasando En esta realidad En este contexto, aqu y ahora.En fin, que es un ensayo genial de los otros no me acuerdo tanto, para ser sincera Y es corto, y tiene una pluma gil Yo lo le obligada para la universidad, lo que despu s agradec , porque es bueno, y porque despu s lo he citado reiteradamente y quedado como reina, jajaja creo yo


  10. says:

    Vargas Llosa is one of my favorite authors of fiction, so I had to read this and did so a number of years ago Based on eight lectures Vargas Llosa gave detailing his personal vision of fiction writing, it s a sweeping and personal introduction to how he sees writing, Latin America, and himself It s worth reading certainly if you like Vargas Llosa, but not as nuanced as I d hoped he could have expanded the lectures to include further discourse in the book as it s rather slim For a better gene Vargas Llosa is one of my favorite authors of fiction, so I had to read this and did so a number of years ago Based on eight lectures Vargas Llosa gave detailing his personal vision of fiction writing, it s a sweeping and personal introduction to how he sees writing, Latin America, and himself It s worth reading certainly if you like Vargas Llosa, but not as nuanced as I d hoped he could have expanded the lectures to include further discourse in the book as it s rather slim For a better general view of a writer s work and opinions based on lectures given at a university, I would suggested H l ne Cixous Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing Still, a good book and not very long

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